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EGD

(Esophagogastroduodenoscopy)

EGD is an endoscopic procedure that allows your doctor to examine your esophagus, stomach, and duodenum (part of your small intestine).

At A Glance: EGD

Also Known As

Esophagogastroduodenoscopy or Upper Endoscopy

Anesthesia

MAC

Hospital Stay

Outpatient

Typical Recovery Time

1-2 Days

Surgery Code

43235

Typical Price Range

Tell Me About The Surgery

Procedure Research and Consultation

Q

How is an EGD done?

A

You will lie on your side during the procedure. A surgeon administers a numbing spray to your throat and inserts a mouthguard to protect your teeth. The endoscope is guided through your mouth and into the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum. Air is pumped through the endoscope to make it easier to see the lining of the esophagus, stomach, and small intestine. Images from the endoscope are viewed on a video monitor while looking for concerns and/or performing treatments.

Q

What issue does EGD surgery solve?

A

A doctor may order an EGD procedure to help diagnose gastrointestinal issues and/or to control upper digestive tract bleeding, stretch narrowed digestive tracts, or remove polyps, tumors, or swallowed objects.

Q

Do I have options for anesthesia for EGD surgery?

A

EGD surgery can be done under MAC, which stands for Monitored Anesthesia Care. This sedation method is performed by anesthesia professional who is in the room with the gastroenterologist and a nurse or technician.

Q

How do I know EGD is right for me?

A

Your gastroenterologist may use EGD to evaluate abdominal pain, heartburn, persistent nausea or vomiting, difficulty swallowing, upper gastrointestinal bleeding, chest pain, or a bloody stool. 

Q

How safe is EGD surgery?

A

EGD is a relatively safe procedure, and potential complications are rare. You should also know that Hancock Regional Hospital has been rated one of the safest hospitals in America by The Leapfrog Group, a national nonprofit health care watchdog organization; and was named the safest hospital in Indiana on the Lown Institute Hospital Index.

Q

What are possible side effects and complications of EGD surgery?

A

While they’re rare, some of the possible complications of this procedure include allergic reactions to the sedative, digestive tract bleeding or infection, or perforation in the digestive tract lining.

Q

What are the alternatives to EGD surgery?

A

Before you decide on EGD as a way to diagnose your gastrointestinal problems, your doctor may discuss and consider other imaging tests such as X-rays or CT scans taken from outside the body.

Q

What are the risks of not having EGD surgery?

A

If your doctor recommends EGD surgery and you don’t have it, you risk a gastrointestinal issue going undiagnosed and symptoms continuing for longer than they need to.

Q

What kind of outcome is typical for EGD surgery?

A

An EGD procedure is typically used to diagnose and evaluate a variety of gastrointestinal issues and in some cases the surgeon may be able to provide definitive treatment.

Consultation and Choosing A Surgeon or Surgical Team

Q

Do I need a referral to see a surgeon about EGD surgery?

A

Your health insurance provider may require you to get a referral from your primary care provider to see a surgeon about EGD surgery.

Q

What should I bring to my first appointment with a surgeon to talk about EGD surgery?

A

You should bring insurance information, medical records, including your medical history from your primary care physician. You should also bring your most recent diagnostic labs and imaging (Not sure where to go? Check out Gateway Hancock Health, where you’ll be able to get in and out quickly and pay, on average, 70% less than you’ll pay at a hospital.)

Q

Do I have to get a second or third opinion for EGD surgery?

A

You can always get a second or third opinion, but it isn’t required. 

Q

How should I decide which surgeon’s advice to follow?

A

You should work with the surgeon with whom you feel comfortable, whether that’s one of our surgeons or not. 

Q

Will the surgical team know my health history?

A

Your health history will be compiled and available to the team before, during, and after surgery. If you’re a Hancock Health patient, we will be able to access your records within our system. If you aren’t, we will work with your doctors to get the necessary information. 

Q

Why might I have to wait to schedule EGD surgery?

A

In some cases it takes time for a patient’s body to be ready for surgery. For example, if you have another medical issue, including another surgical procedure or an illness, we might wait to schedule surgery. Your health and safety are our top priorities, so we schedule surgeries when they’re best for our patients.

Q

What happens if my symptoms get worse while I wait for EGD surgery?

A

Your surgical team will evaluate the situation and help you make a choice that’s right for you and your health. Temporary treatments might be used if your surgery is rescheduled. 

Insurance & Cost

Q

How much does EGD surgery cost?

A

Consult the Price Transparency Tool at HancockRegionalHospital.org for an idea of how much EGD surgery might cost.

Q

Will insurance cover EGD surgery?

A

In most cases, insurance will cover most of the costs associated with EGD surgery. To obtain your possible out-of-pocket expenses, use our Price Estimator Tool.

Q

Will Medicare cover EGD surgery?

A

Medicare parts A and B will cover the cost of EGD surgery, but it’s important for your doctor to indicate that the surgery is medically necessary. 

Q

What are payment options like for EGD surgery at Hancock Health?

A

Hancock Health is committed to helping make great care affordable for all patients. To find out more about payment options, please visit the billing and insurance FAQ page at HancockRegionalHospital.org.

Pre-op and Day of Surgery

Q

How should I prepare for this EGD surgery?

A

You’ll probably be instructed not to eat anything after midnight on the day of your surgery, and you might also be told to stop taking certain medications or dietary supplements.

Q

Why can’t I eat before surgery?

A

There’s a risk of aspiration, which means breathing foreign objects, like food or saliva, into your lungs. This can occur because the anesthetic for surgery can impair your body’s ability to stop the contents of your stomach from entering your lungs. 

Q

What should I expect right before EGD surgery?

A

You’ll arrive several hours before your surgery and be escorted to the preoperative waiting area.You’ll remove all of your clothing and jewelry and put on a hospital gown. (Your valuables will be placed in a secure area or may be given to a family member.) You’ll sign any necessary paperwork and a preoperative nurse will take your vital signs, review your medications, and answer any questions.You’ll meet your anesthesiologist and the members of your surgery team.An I.V. (intravenous line) will be placed in your hand or arm, so medications—including anesthesia—can be administered.When it’s time for your surgery, you will be wheeled into the operating suite on a stretcher.

Q

Will I need someone to take me home after EGD surgery?

A

For your safety and the safety of other motorists, you will need someone to drive you home. If you don’t have a ride, we’ll help you arrange one.

Q

Why are there so many people on my surgery team?

A

In addition to the surgeon, you have an anesthesiologist, nurses—some of them specialize in working with patients and others assist the surgeon—and support staff, who get you checked in and out, compile your records, and more. They all work together, performing their individual jobs, so the procedure is as successful as possible. 

Q

Why am I asked for my name and date of birth every time I get medicine?

A

It’s a safety precaution to make sure you’re receiving the medication that’s prescribed for you.

Q

What do I need to bring to the hospital the day of my EGD surgery?

A

Although EGD is typically an outpatient procedure, consider bringing anything you’ll need for an overnight stay, including a change of underwear, a sweatshirt, glasses or contacts, headphones, and your medications.

Q

How long does it take the anesthesia to wear off?

A

It may take several hours for the effects of sedation with MAC to wear off. For your safety, do not drive or operate any machinery that could be dangerous until the medicine wears off.

During Surgery

Q

What will happen during EGD surgery?

A

You’ll breathe oxygen through a breathing tube and your team will track your vital signs as the surgery is performed.

Q

When will my family be informed about how I’m doing?

A

Our associates will get information from the surgical team in the operating room during your surgery and keep them updated. 

Q

How long will the EGD procedure take?

A

EGD surgery typically takes 30 minutes to one hour. 

Q

How long will I be in the hospital after EGD surgery?

A

Patients are typically released on the same day as their EGD surgery. 

After Surgery

Q

What can I expect right after EGD surgery?

A

You’ll wake up from surgery in the recovery room and, as you start to regain feeling in your body, you’ll receive pain medication. After leaving the recovery room, you’ll be taken to your hospital room where you will be able to see friends or family who came with you. 

Q

How will I know if EGD surgery worked?

A

Your surgeon will discuss your procedure with you. You may notice some gas and discomfort for one to two days after surgery.

Q

When will I get to talk to my surgeon after surgery?

A

You’ll be able to talk to your surgeon immediately after your procedure, while you’re in the recovery room.

Q

How soon after EGD surgery will I be up and moving around?

A

You’ll be up and moving around shortly after your surgery. 

Q

Will I receive pain medication right after EGD surgery?

A

In most cases, patients receive pain medication immediately following surgery.

Q

How soon after EGD surgery can I eat or drink?

A

You may not be able to eat or drink right away and you may be asked to follow a clear fluid diet for one to three days. After that, you may return to solid foods—but easy-to-digest items, including soups, pudding, and yogurt, are recommended.

Q

Will I need to fill any prescriptions or take medication after EGD surgery?

A

You may be prescribed pain medication or other symptom-reducing medications.

Recovery and Follow-Up

Q

What will I need to do to prepare for my recovery from EGD surgery?

A

There is minimal recovery from EGD surgery, but you may want to ask a friend or relative to check in on you on the days after surgery. You should also make sure you have some easy-to-digest items on hand when you arrive home from the hospital. 

Q

If I need physical therapy or rehabilitation for EGD surgery, how is that arranged?

A

You should not need physical therapy after EGD surgery, but our associates will help you arrange the postoperative care you’ll need.

Q

Will I need any follow-up appointments or procedures after EGD surgery?

A

Your follow-up appointments and procedures will vary depending on what your gastroenterologist discovers during the procedure. It can take up to two weeks to receive the results of a biopsy. 

Q

Will there be any scarring or stitches to remove after EGD surgery?

A

You should not have any scarring or stitches to remove. 

Q

What do I need to have to care for any wounds or incisions?

A

You will not need to care for any wounds or incisions.  

Q

What should I do if I have an emergency or accident after EGD surgery?

A

You should call your healthcare provider if you experience a chronic cough, coughing up or vomiting blood, difficulty swallowing, severe throat pain, chest or abdominal pain, or black stool. If you’re in need of immediate emergency services, go to the nearest emergency room.

Q

When will I be able to get back to work after EGD surgery?

A

You should be able to return to work one to two days after surgery. 

Meet Our Surgeons

Ma’n Abdullah, MD

P: 317-477-6360

Gastroenterology

Affordable Labs and Imaging at Gateway Hancock Health

Need preoperative blood tests or an MRI? Check out Gateway Hancock Health, where labs and imaging prices are 70% lower than you’d pay at a hospital. An MRI that might cost as much as $1,600 is just $599 at Gateway. 

Learn More

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Whether you’re looking for an initial consultation, a second opinion, or you just have a few more questions, we’re here to help. Fill out the form below and we’ll get back to you within one business day.

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